How Many Days A Week Do People Typically Eat Breakfast? - Exclusive Survey

For many, breakfast gives us a much-needed boost to start our day off on the right foot. Registered dietitian Beth Czerwony seems to agree, telling the Cleveland Clinic, "Would you start a long road trip in your car with the tank on empty? Think of eating breakfast the same way. You're asking a lot of your body to get moving using only your reserves."

Kicking off our day with a healthy morning meal can offer many potential health benefits. As per the Cleveland Clinic, such benefits include increases in cardiovascular health, a decreased risk for Type 2 diabetes, and minimizing brain fog throughout the day. In children, the International Food Information Council Foundation reports that eating breakfast may increase a child's academic performance in school. Experts say that children are more inclined to eat breakfast in the morning if caregivers set an example of doing so themselves. Yet how many of us are regularly eating breakfast throughout the week? Health Digest issued an exclusive survey to find out the answer.

The majority of participants eat breakfast every day

We asked 583 participants how often they eat breakfast on a weekly basis. Answers ranged from zero to all seven days of the week. 49 respondents reported that they never eat breakfast during the course of the week. A little over 18% of participants stated that they eat breakfast one to two days of the week, while slightly fewer respondents — 16.81% for a total of 98 people — said they consume breakfast three to four days each week. Even fewer, 77 respondents reported eating breakfast five to six days throughout the week, a total of 13.21%. However, the vast majority of respondents said that they start their day off with breakfast all seven days of the week. 43.4% of respondents were everyday breakfast eaters, a total of 253 participants.

Despite how often or seldom one may opt to eat breakfast, Beth Czerwony tells the Cleveland Clinic that eating habits will vary based on each person's individual needs. "An early breakfast may not be for everyone," Czerwony tells the publication. "Listen to your hunger cues to know how important it is for you. What you eat over the whole day is more important than stressing over breakfast."